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Ruth Naomi Floyd

Ruth Naomi Floyd, "The Veil Series"

ARTIST'S STATEMENT I am fascinated by the human face and find joy in creating portraits. I choose the medium of black and white photography because it allows me to express the brightest white to the deepest black and the vivid gray shades that fall in between. My photographs reveal images that are already deeply etched in my mind and soul. In the language of silence and stillness, we are led to places where we may discover the stirring of mystery and the calm of peace. Throughout that journey one encounters many challenges, such as, the pull of memory and the struggle to balance communion with others and with oneself in the space of vulnerability.  My art trusts in the hope of discovery. My goal is for my images to evoke a response, whether positive or negative. I humbly accept the process of creating art as a gift from God. These images are a product of that gift. Art is essential to human life and its spirit; art can speak to the human condition and strengthen and revolutionize thoughts and lives. When that happens, the art is the message and the artist is merely the messenger.” The Veil Series is a body of fine art black and white photographic images that express the different “veils” we experience while traveling on the path of life. Throughout life’s journey we encounter themes that may reveal our struggle to stand, fall or kneel. It is in these seasons we choose to embrace, reject, shield, conceal, shroud and grasp the realities of our veiled experience. For the One who created us is the only One who fully sees through our veils. The photographic images were captured using silver based films with 35 mm and 4×5 inch view cameras. I use traditional wet darkroom technology as well as digital printing on archival papers to produce the final images. The Veil Series is accompanied by music compositions, which are deeply rooted in the jazz improvisational idiom, and reflects the musical languages of European Classical and American Folk music. Artist Representation by White Stone Gallery. www.rnfimages.com ruthnaomifloyd@hotmail.com 215.971.5808
Janet Whittle Freedman

Janet Whittle Freedman

Ellen Kalin

Ellen Kalin

Janet Krehbiel Pieracci

Janet Krehbiel Pieracci

ARTIST STATEMENT This series of paintings dealing with the subject of forced migration of people started with a much anticipated visit to China in 2007. I wanted to see for myself the Yangtze River valley and what was happening to it with the building of China’s largest hydroelectric dam. I could hardly imagine the damage reeked on the land as the waters rose and the heartache of millions as their homes were destroyed. I wanted to be a witness while this was happening. After I returned I completed studies for several paintings and more concerning China. But what kept swirling through my mind were the numbers; of towns closed, of the number of feet the water had to rise. Numbers were usually big when the subject was anything to do with China. And numbers can quickly become overwhelming, impersonal and insignificant. This is how I began to develop a painting to express visually both great number and individual distinction. ABOUT THE ARTIST Janet’s interest in forced migration stems from personal – and family – experience, rooted in a long-standing commitment to issues of justice, community service and internationalism. Growing up in Ann Arbor in the 1970s, and as the daughter of a social worker/Presbyterian minister, she had early exposure to civil rights marches, peace vigils, multi-culturalism, feminism, and debate of international issues including Vietnam, Cambodian refugees, and US hegemony in Latin America. “One of the first drawings I can remember making was in answer to my fourth grade art teacher’s direction to draw a picture of your summer vacation. I made a picture of the ‘Peacemobile,’ with my sister and me standing in front handing out pamphlets … “
Irv Freedman

Irv Freedman

Rebecca Rogers, "Everything You Need to Know About Rabbits"

ARTIST'S STATEMENT Nothing else has influenced me more than my memories of spending hours and hours in my grandmother's basement studio making puppets and stuffed animals, drawings and paintings. This body of work is a way for me to express my deep nostalgia for childhood and my love for collecting, reading, and studying children's picture books. Through the rich and plentiful history of these books, I have learned so much, from technical skills to expressing emotion. I was inspired by my grandmother and favorite illustrators from childhood to use traditional water-based mediums. The luminance and fluidity that come so naturally with watercolor remind me of the purity and innocence of my first art-making experiences. I still vividly recall being three years old and enjoying the encouragement of my grandmother, a phenomenally multitalented artist, published doll and toy maker, and my biggest supporter. I chose to use rabbits because the illustrators that inspire me the most are those who bring non-human characters to life. The animal characters seem less exclusive. I can see more of myself in dogs, cats, baboons, etc. than a little boy or little girl, because animals exist in all shapes and sizes and color, negating the prejudices we sometimes have for each other. Additionally, I simply find it more exciting to see a rabbit reading a book than a human! ABOUT THE ARTIST Rebecca Rogers is a 25 year old illustrator and collector. Born in Nashville, TN, she spent much time in her grandfather's frame shop and her grandmother's workshop. When she was 14, her family moved to Paris, France where she spent much of her time hiding in the museums. In 2006 she moved to Baltimore to attend the Maryland Institute College of Art. She continues to live in Baltimore with her fiancé.

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